Good quality tools are as important to a motorcycle rider as a good set of riding clothes and helmet. The best and usually most expensive tools are really the preserve of the person who makes their living servicing and repairing motorcycles. The motorcycle rider services their motorcycle by following the manufacturer's recommendations on a time or mileage basis, but this doesn't mean that those old spanners and hammer that were found at the back of the shed will do.

 Purchase what you can afford, bearing in mind that you can add tools to your toolkit over a period of time. Its worth paying the extra for good quality tools that are going to last, also it lowers the risk of personal injury such as skinned knuckles and cut fingers. There are various places where you can purchase tools, including high street automotive stores and hardware stores. I get a good percentage of my tools from B&Q and Machine Mart, the tools are of good quality and value for money. Your local motorcycle dealer will stock tools that are specific to your motorcycle and will be able to order manufacturer's service tools, such as a socket for tightening the steering stem lock nut. Mail order firms now stock a large range of tools, and some companies are specifically geared to the needs of the motorcyclist.

Another place for tools is the internet. With tools you get what you pay for, cheap tools don't last long and can damage parts on your motorcycle, and greatly increases the risk of personal injury. New motorcycles are supplied with a toolkit which usually comprises a few open-ended spanners, a spark plug spanner, pliers and screwdriver, all kept in a plastic wallet. Its better to make up your own kit, think about what might happen when your on the road, and the tools your going to need to access the parts and hopefully get your motorcycle running again if you break down. Lastly, it sounds obvious but make sure your toolkit fits on the motorcycle securely. Ride safe.